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Tag Archives: value contrast

We just finished our fall/winter session of Watercolor Landscapes class.

Cindy Guzik3

Cindy Guzik3

We worked on five different challenges. We always begin with designing a landscape with a strong and identifiable center of interest. We discuss gridding a reference photo for perspective and cropping it  for the best composition .

Kathleen Smierciak4

Kathleen Smierciak4

Kathleen Smierciak3

Kathleen Smierciak3

In the second week we discussed value contrast and everyone was asked to paint two or three small value studies in one color and then translate one of those studies into a color painting.  We also talked about our palette and how some of our colors fit in value ranges of light, medium and dark.  I showed them how they could make color squares on paper to determine which ones were the darkest and which were lightest. We reached a consensus that most of our brightest colors fell in the mid value range. Our darks seemed to be the staining and more transparent colors of all. Of course there were exceptions but not that many.

Sue Mendenhall5

Sue Mendenhall5

Betty Bercot

Betty Bercot

We discussed how we could divide space and enhance depth and create drama just by changing the values within that space.

 

nancy-longmate4

Nancy Longmate4

henn-laidroo3

Henn Laidroo3

We painted buildings and man-made objects. Notice how the small cars in the fist painting and the people on the deck in the second one ad some life to a painting.

judy-notestine

Judy Notestine

The last week I asked everyone to attempt a painting they would not normally attempt or one that looked too hard.

If you would like to see all of their work you can scroll to the top of the page and click on Student Art: Watercolor Landscape 2016 in the list of pages or just click here.

Thank you to all the artists who shared their art on this blog!

This was a project I began because I was interested in the stark contrast between the dark tunnel and the scene beyond. Like the previous post, “A Secret Place”,  I found this image on the wet canvas site.  This took much longer to create than I had anticipated.  I didn’t realise how much I had to move between organic and geometric shapes.  I figured I would just render an impressionistic landscape and surround it with darks. NOT! I had to study warmth of the shadow on the water, fading out the building in the scene, making the posts and rails of the guard rail believable, and drawing the oblique shape of the opening of the tunnel accurately. The tunnel and the sidewalk were both cooler and darker than the shadow reflected on the surface of the water and it was a challenge to balance the two so that it read right.  I worked on this, on and off, for the last two weeks and practiced many of the washes on a separate piece of watercolor paper.

Last night I saw a really beautiful painting done with a strong contrast between light and dark on David Tripp’s Blog here.