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Tag Archives: Drawing

I  just completed two more classes this week. The first to finish up is a new class offering. It is titled Advanced Watercolor and is open to students who have taken all of the other watercolor classes that are offered at least once. Each student is given goal sheets to complete on each painting. They are to set a goal to complete 3 paintings in the six week period. Many of these students have already been completing a painting a week. This offers them more time to work on larger works or works that are more involved or have mixed media techniques that require more time. There are no specific assignments and the artist can explore techniques they have already learned or new ones. There is a sharing session and group critique at the end of each class session. I am there to mentor, answer questions, or demonstrate when a student needs to see a technique done again. Some students work beyond my expertise and I am just there to encourage.

One student, in this session, made a book of watercolor portraits of witches. Below are some of the witches she included in her book:

Marilyn Bultemeier2

Marilyn Bultemeier3

Marilyn Bultemeier5

Some students worked on painting using negative space, Some used collage in their work while another experimented with painting on watercolor canvas. One student chose to study rock and water and how to best paint them. Another student is writing and illustrating a children’s book and yet another did a gouache resist. If you would like to view all 40 of their paintings click here.

The other class that ended was Beginning Drawing.

We began by drawing in continuous line both blind and looking. I spoke of cross contours in their work and how they should be included to show the shape of objects.

Here is a self portrait using  blind continuous line and cross contour:

Dennis Foote

We learned about negative space and how to look for those shapes that help to complete a drawing:

Heather Terrill3

We studied perspective:

Chris Petersen2

We learned about value and making different marks to create interest in our drawings. We practiced value by studying the value changes in a set of photographed eyes and also by cutting a picture in different shapes. This helped to get our mind off of drawing a complete drawing at once while we practiced making value marks.

Alison Metzger6

Sydney Salway5

We gridded photos and learned how to enlarge the photo on our drawing paper so that it would have the right proportions to grid properly:

Heather Terrill7

Everyone worked on drawing their self portrait:

Alison Metzger7

We worked on still life in class and at home:

Sydney Salway

Chris Petersen6

If you would like to view all their drawings click here.

Thank you to all the students who continue to allow me to post their work here.

 

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I just finished Beginning Drawing and Creative Challenge Classes.

In drawing class we covered blind continuous line, contour line, cross contour, negative space, perspective and foreshortening, value and the different ways to make marks for shading with a pencil. We worked from still life and photos, both. We learned about the measurements of the human face and practiced self portraits in the mirror. We learned how to grid as well as how to measure real life objects with our pencil.  Below are a few examples.

Laura Butchko: Blind Continuous Line

 

Sonny Ulrey: Perspective

Sonny didn’t get a chance to finish this the night we studied perspective. I don’t mind this, though. Sometimes saying less is more.

Leona Smith5: Self Portrait

 

Jennifer Howey5: Still life and Perspective

If you would like to view all of their drawings please click, above, on Student Art: Beginning Drawing Spring 2017 or just click here.

In Creative Challenge we studied:

Nancy Longmate

…creating a center of interest on or near a “sweet spot”.

Linda Flatley4

…different ways to attract our viewer’s attention.

Jan Reche2

…shape and design and several ways to create a still life.

Melissa Scare3

,,,division of space and making no two passages the same. This particular painting is a portrait of the artist using symbols.

Janet Heffley2

…value. Everyone created an underwater painting.

Henn Laidroo

…color. the above painting was for an assignment using only secondary colors.

If you would like to view many other paintings created in this class, click on Student Art: Creative Challenge, above, or just click here.

Thank you to all my students for sharing your art here.

We just completed our fall beginning drawing class.

We began with blind continuous line drawing.

Audrey Schultheis

Audrey Schultheis

We progressed to continuous and broken line drawing…

Joel Harmeyer

Joel Harmeyer

…with an emphasis on cross contour and form:

Andrea Harneyer2

Andrea Harneyer2

We studied and drew objects that had negative space that helped define their shape.

Betty Bercot3

Betty Bercot3

Andrea Harmeyer5

Andrea Harmeyer5

We studied perspective and drew interiors.

Audrey Schultheis4

Audrey Schultheis4

We studied value from still life…

Betty Bercot6

Betty Bercot6

…and photos:

Dawn Amstutz 4

Dawn Amstutz 4

We practiced all our skills the last night of class using an Elegant Writer” calligraphy pen to create a line a wash drawing.

Dawn Amstutz6

Dawn Amstutz6

Joel Harmeyer5

Joel Harmeyer5

If you would like to view more examples of their work click here.

Thank you to all the students who agreed to share their work here!

I just finished teaching a six week class of beginning drawing. I have posted a selection of drawings on a page that you can reach by clicking here. Thank you to all the students who contributed their work to this post and the attached page.

Here is a description of some of the things we worked on in this class:

Andrea Ritter

Andrea Ritter

We worked on blind continuous line and looking continuous line drawings. The students were asked to feel the form of what they were drawing. We did this with hands and apples and self portraits and they practiced with other objects they found around their home for homework. We discussed and practiced cross contours, not just the outlines of things we were studying.

Rose Clair

Rose Clair

We studied negative space and drew the shapes we viewed between the legs and supports of a stool in order to find the positive shape of that stool. Drawing the shapes between the edges of the leaves of plants and slats on a chair are good for practice seeing negative space and shapes.

Andrea Ritter2

Andrea Ritter2

Donald Cooper4

Donald Cooper4

We learned to measure shapes and to determine angles with our pencils and how to translate them onto our page. Everyone practiced this skill by drawing an interior room. We learned that objects overlap in space and get smaller when distant. We learned that objects became blurry and less clear in the distance and that all these things enhanced depth in a drawing. This helped us to get our drawings into perspective and to become more believable.

Rose Clair3

Rose Clair3

On the 4th week we began to study value. We, first, studied the different ways we could shade and make marks; side of pencil, pointillism, crosshatching, squiggles and lines rendered side by side.

We used photos of strips of eyes to practice shading in the value shapes in medium and dark tones, leaving the white of the paper for our lights.

Susie Covitt3

Susie Covitt3

We also cut a colored photo into strips and studied the value changes in color by translating the shapes of values we saw into graphite.

Susie Covitt4

Susie Covitt4

We practiced drawing and shading clear glass objects from life. Note how this artist used different pencil marks to indicate the contours of the bottles.

Dianna Chad3

Dianna Chad3

We practiced drawing and shading a self portrait as viewed in a mirror. We all remarked about the “self portrait stares” we were getting. 🙂

Donald Cooper

Donald Cooper

Andrea Ritter3

Andrea Ritter3

We learned to grid a photo and transform the format of the photo and the grid onto our drawing paper.

Dianna Chad4

Dianna Chad4

We used all the skills we had learned to draw a still life of a pile of boxes.

Viewers can enlarge any of the above drawings by just clicking on them.

Anna Bell4

Anna Bell4

We began this drawing class by learning to “see”, drawing objects, blindly, with what is called blind continuous line. We, then, drew continuous line drawings while looking, paying careful attention to the cross contours in our subject material.

Todd Dunn2

Todd Dunn2

We studied negative space and began to recognize when we could use the shape and space behind an object to help us describe the subject.

Alan Pareis3

Alan Pareis3

The students worked very hard to begin to see perspective and to measure the angles of lines with their pencils. They used a corner of a room as their subject.

Vanessa Fankhauser4

Vanessa Fankhauser4

During the fourth week, they cut photos in strips and practiced laying in three values. They worked from black and white as well as color photos to do this.

Alan Pareis2

Alan Pareis2

They studied the values they saw in a glass, still life study.

Myrna Nelson4

Myrna Nelson4

They learned to grid a photograph and measure and enlarge that photograph by creating a proportionate grid on their drawing paper.

Todd Dunn

Todd Dunn

They studied drawing their self portraits. If you wish to view a larger selection of their drawings you can find them by clicking here or by scrolling to the top of the page and clicking on the small label Student Art: Beginning Drawing.  If you click on each drawing, they will enlarge. Thank you to all the fine artists who took this class!

By Roxanne Yoquelet

By Roxanne Yoquelet

By Paula Pritchard

By Paula Pritchard

By Laura Lindsay

By Laura Lindsay

The first Beginning Drawing class of this year has ended. I can’t resist posting these blind continuous line “selfies” that they learn the first night of class in order to get out of their left brain and really begin to “see” and feel the contours of a subject. There is such honesty in them as I know many of you understand. These students worked hard through six weeks of learning to use line and value. They studied negative space, perspective and cross contours, also. They learned to use their pencil to determine angles and measure length. They began using plumb lines, practiced gridding a photo reference and learned how to crop for scenes and subjects for a center of interest. If you would like to view more of their work, I have devoted a page to that. You can access that gallery by clicking here.  …or by clicking on the Beg. Drawing page at the top of this blog.

Thank you to all my students who allowed their work to be posted here!

Linda Fremder

Linda Fremder

Joni Dick2

Joni Dick2

Jeanne Kensill4

Jeanne Kensill4

The above three drawings were drawn without looking at the paper. It is the first skill my beginning drawing students learn. I am always amazed at the ability we have to actually feel the surface of what we see and transpose it to the paper with just a few directions.

In class, the students learned blind continuous line, continuous line, negative space, one point perspective, cross contours, value and gridding. They worked from both live objects and photos. My main goal was to help them to see and then feel the contours and decipher the angles and values of what they see.

This class was a joy to teach and it is my hope that they continue to explore drawing and art in the future. If you would like to view a gallery of their work this last six weeks click here or the link at the top of the page titled “Student Art: Beg. Drawing”.

Mary Smierciak3

Mary Smierciak3       Blind Line Contour

Lisa McGuffey3

Lisa McGuffey3  Blind Line Contour

Jerry Young

Jerry Young  Value Study

The above drawings are from my beginning drawing class that just finished up. Over a six week period, they worked their way through blind line contour, negative space, perspective, simple value studies and still life. They worked from both life and photo reference and learned how to use their pencils for measuring, a viewfinder for focus and a simple crosshair grid for perspective.  If you would like to view more of their drawings, click here.

David Hess

David Hess

Dianna Burt

Dianna Burt

The above paintings are examples of portraits painted in the six week watercolor portrait class that just finished up. They concentrated on facial features the first week and then worked their way through using a grid for obtaining a likeness, skin colors, color combinations, and compositon as it pertains to portraiture. The last night of class was devoted to painting a self portrait. If you would like to view more of their work click here.

Thankyou to all the students who have contributed their art to be viewed here.

blindapple  Blind continuous line apple

blindhand  Blind continuous line hand

handlinecontour  Continuous line hand (looking)

negspacestool   Negative space of stool

stooldrawing   Negative space study of stool completed drawing

bottleandglass   Value study of clear glass

valuestrips   Value studies

We cut strips and traced the format on our paper and chose values, light medium, and dark to the patterns of value we saw.

cornerofroom   Perspective study of the corner of a room

selfportrait2013   Self portrait

The above drawings illustrate some of the work my beginning drawing class has been working on in the first four weeks. We began with blind line drawings and worked our way through contour line, negative space, value, perspective and are even working at drawing our reverse images in a mirror. All the above drawings are either demos from class or examples I drew to share as examples.

This weekend I worked with my Granddaughter from a book I purchased that I learned about from Sherry here. The book is titled Amazing Crayon Drawing with Lee Hammond by Lee Hammond. I thought the Granddaughter could use these skills at home in her free time. We drew from tutored examples of a palm tree silhouetted against a sunset and a mountain scene. Here are our finished crayon drawings:

palmtree    Granddaughter’s Palm Tree

palmtreegr   Grandma’s Palm Tree

mountains   Granddaughter’s Mountains

mountainsgr   Grandma’s Mountains

Olly

Olly is my friend’s  husband’s dog. He is also a friend to Hailey, featured in the previous post. I really enjoyed painting these two collies. Olly is the Rough Coat Collie, like Lassie of TV fame. The one thing I had to concentrate on, throughout painting him, was that his painting may hang with the one I did of Hailey.  This is why I faced him left. That way, when they hung on the wall,  they would face each other. The other thing I had to be aware of is that they would look better if paintied in much the same style, using the same color scheme. That is why the background is the same and I approached sculpting the forms of his face similar to the way I painted Hailey. I have never attempted something like this before, so that was a learning experience.

Olly2

Above is my initial drawing. I had to draw him twice. The first attempt was way off!  I had trouble with getting the length and width of his nose correct. I used cross hairs the second time and that did the trick. My perspective had been off.

Olly3

Olly had white hairs running through his coat, so I frisketed those. I also frisketed the highlight in his eyes as well as the lighter areas to either side of his iris and began adding the first tentative strokes of color.

Olly4

This step was largely sculpting the nose forms and studying where I would need to have lighter color under darker color. I felt a need to establish the darkness of the eye because many of the darks in Olly’s coat matched the values found in his eyes. I pinked the nose as my initial step on that and pinked the shapes on the inside of his ears. These were all the lighter colors I saw under and around the darker values I had yet to render.

Olly5

In this step, I did most of my painting. I frisketed the pink dots on Olly’s nose. I darkened the areas of dark coat in the way I read the patterns. I frisketed more of the long hairs from his ears so the would show up after laying in the background. I, then painted the background in. I knew I’d need to do that so I could finish my darks in his ears and his nose and have the correct value tones. So many times, I have painted the background in, only to find I had to retouch the portrait because the background lightened the foreground dramatically. At this stage, I always know how I am going to finish a painting. I have enough information down and it is just a matter of detailing and getting the darks to read right.

Olly  finished painting

In the last step I  detailed the darks in the ears and painted in some of the white hairs that poked out from around them. I detailed the nose and mouth, darkened the darker portions of pattern in his coat, erased the frisket and worked on softening some of the edges around those frisketed patches.  I darkened the whites on either side of his iris and painted a faint shadow under the upper lid of his eye. I added the whiskers with a rigger.  The last thing I did was shadow the coat under Olly’s chin with a mixture of the blue I used for the background and a light touch of the browns I had used. I also shadowed the white patch of his coat in the lower right hand corner for balance.

A huge thank you to my friends for sending me the photos to use for reference, so I could paint these two beautiful dogs!    🙂